50 Greatest Pinoy Films of All Time, Part 5 (10-1)

10 – TINIMBANG KA NGUNIT KULANG (Lino Brocka, 1974)

tinimbang ka2Brocka’s powerful commentary on middle-class Christians’ opinion and treatment of people in the margins is as biting now as when it was released.

Voted by:

  • Dwein Tarhata Baltazar (Director, Mamay Umeng)
  • John Bedia (Writer; Amok, Boundary): “A searing and excellent social commentary.”
  • Jan Philippe Carpio (Director; Balay Daku, Girl of My Dreams): “A film that exposed the hypocrisy and collusion between the elite, the community and the religious and showed how much the dictates of society are incompatible with real love and compassion.”
  • Skilty Labastilla (Member, Young Critics Circle Film Desk)
  • Eileen Legaspi-Ramirez (Art Studies Professor, UP Diliman)
  • Ian Loreños (Director; Alagwa, The Leaving)
  • Dado Lumibao (Director; In da Red Corner, Must Be Love)
  • Dennis Marasigan (Director; Sa North Diversion Road, Vox Populi)
  • Adrian Mendizabal (Film Writer, Auditoire)
  • Ramon Nocon (Board Member, Society of Filipino Archivists for Film)
  • Jose Javier Reyes (Director; Makati Ave: Office Girls, Kasal Kasali Kasalo)
  • Jun Cruz Reyes (Former Member, Manunuri ng Pelikulang Pilipino)
  • Mike Sandejas (Director; Tulad ng Dati, Dinig Sana Kita)
  • Jake Tordesillas (Writer; High School Circa ’65, Bagets): “Brought awareness during 70s that Pinoy films can compare with American movies.”
  • Rodolfo Vera (Writer: Niño; Norte, Hangganan ng Kasaysayan)
  • G.A. Villafuerte (Director, Lihim ng mga Nympha, Hardinero)
  • Award-winning scriptwriter/producer who wishes to remain anonymous

9 – BATCH ’81 (Mike de Leon, 1982)

batch 81Made during the turbulent last few years of the Marcos regime, Batch 81’s brilliant exploration of a college fraternity acted as a critique of a brutal fascist government.

Voted by:

  • Dwein Tarhata Baltazar (Director, Mamay Umeng)
  • Theodore Boborol (Writer; My Big Love, Kelly! Kelly! Ang Hit na Musical)
  • Archie del Mundo (Director; Taksikab, Ang Misis ni Meyor)
  • Jojo Devera (Film Writer, Sari-Saring Sineng Pinoy): “Ostensibly the story of seven young men who join a college fraternity, Batch ’81 is an orgy of physical and psychological violence. What makes the film classic is its use of the technical virtuosity displayed by Mike de Leon to convey political, social and philosophical meaning.”
  • Zig Dulay (Writer; Posas, Ad Ignorantiam)
  • Jag Garcia (Film Professor, De la Salle-College of Saint Benilde)
  • Chuck Gutierrez (Producer, MNL 143; Director, Ulian)
  • Jason Jacobo (Member, Young Critics Circle Film Desk)
  • Skilty Labastilla (Member, Young Critics Circle Film Desk)
  • Ian Loreños (Director; Alagwa, The Leaving)
  • Eduardo Roy, Jr. (Director; Bahay Bata; Quick Change)
  • Mike Sandejas (Director; Tulad ng Dati, Dinig Sana Kita)
  • Chris Eriz Sta. Maria (Film Blogger, The One-Legged Woman is Queen)
  • Dondon Santos (Director; Noy, Dalaw)
  • Rolando Tolentino (Member, Manunuri ng Pelikulang Pilipino)
  • Nestor U. Torre (Film Writer, Philippine Daily Inquirer)
  • Rodolfo Vera (Writer: Niño; Norte, Hangganan ng Kasaysayan)

8 – GANITO KAMI NOON… PAANO KAYO NGAYON? (Eddie Romero, 1976)

Ganito Kami NoonSome people have observed that Romero’s majestic picaresque tale was a precursor to Forrest Gump: its protagonist is a simple-minded young man who sets out on a journey from his quiet hometown, gets enmeshed in the country’s historical upheavals, falls in love, gets his heart broken, learns to forgive, and ends up a wiser man. Ganito Kami Noon is the more accomplished work.

Voted by:

  • Misha Anissimov (Film Professor, University of San Carlos)
  • Patrick Campos (Professor, UP Film Institute)
  • Jan Philippe Carpio (Director; Balay Daku, Girl of My Dreams): “A film that showed me how much of personal experience and perspective is left out of history and experiences, and how much of history has become myth making instead of a genuine investigation into the possibilities of experiences.”
  • Ray Defante Gibraltar (Director; Wanted: Border, When Timawa Meets Delgado)
  • Benjamin Garcia (Director; Batad: Sa Paang Palay, Philippino Story)
  • Eulalio Guieb III (Professor, UP College of Mass Communications)
  • Joni Gutierrez (Professor, UP Film Institute)
  • Mario Hernando (Member, Manunuri ng Pelikulang Pilipino)
  • Jeffrey Jeturian (Director; Kubrador, Pila Balde)
  • Ralston Jover (Director; Bakal Boys, Bendor)
  • Skilty Labastilla (Member, Young Critics Circle Film Desk)
  • Bienvenido Lumbera (National Artist for Literature)
  • Dado Lumibao (Director; In da Red Corner, Must Be Love)
  • Dennis Marasigan (Director; Sa North Diversion Road, Vox Populi)
  • Ricky Orellana (Board Member, Society of Filipino Archivists for Film, Inc.): “Eddie Romero’s picaresque narrative set in the 1890’s captured the panache that belies the theme’s seriousness (Filipino’s search for national identity).”
  • Cenon Palomares (Lecturer, UP Film Institute)
  • Vincent Sandoval (Director; Aparisyon, Señorita)
  • Carlitos Siguion-Reyna (Director; Ikaw Pa Lang ang Minahal, Ligaya ang Itawag Mo sa Akin)
  • Rianne Hill Soriano (Film Reviewer, Business World)
  • Nicanor Tiongson (Professor Emeritus, UP Film Institute)
  • Rolando Tolentino (Member, Manunuri ng Pelikulang Pilipino)
  • Jake Tordesillas (Writer; High School Circa ’65, Bagets): “Boyet as Kulas is a fun way to do Philippine history.”
  • Nestor U. Torre (Film Writer, Philippine Daily Inquirer)
  • Rodolfo Vera (Writer: Niño; Norte, Hangganan ng Kasaysayan)

7 – INSIANG (Lino Brocka, 1976)

InsiangBrocka’s searing treatment of a mother-daughter relationship in the slums is a perfect melding of melodrama and Greek tragedy. Features one of the best ensemble performances in local cinema.

Voted by:

  • Adolfo Alix, Jr. (Director; Mater Dolorosa, Kalayaan)
  • Ray Defante Gibraltar (Director; Wanted: Border, When Timawa Meets Delgado)
  • Wenn Deramas (Director; Ang Tanging Ina, Praybeyt Benjamin): “Tatatlo lamang ang tauhan, isang masikip at mabahong lugar, pero nabuo ang kwento ng pagmamahal, betrayal at paghihiganti, napakaganda ng characterization ni Insiang at ng nanay niya.”
  • Gary Devilles (Professor, Kagawaran ng Filipino, Ateneo de Manila University)
  • Benjamin Garcia (Director; Batad: Sa Paang Palay, Philippino Story)
  • Jag Garcia (Film Professor, De la Salle-College of Saint Benilde)
  • Chuck Gutierrez (Producer, MNL 143; Director, Ulian)
  • Joni Gutierrez (Professor, UP Film Institute)
  • Mario Hernando (Member, Manunuri ng Pelikulang Pilipino)
  • Jeffrey Jeturian (Director; Kubrador, Pila Balde)
  • Skilty Labastilla (Member, Young Critics Circle Film Desk)
  • Ian Loreños (Director; Alagwa, The Leaving)
  • Gutierrez Mangansakan II (Director; Limbunan, Qiyamah)
  • Senedy Que (Writer; Mga Munting Tinig, Homecoming)
  • Jose Javier Reyes (Director; Makati Ave: Office Girls, Kasal Kasali Kasalo)
  • Jun Cruz Reyes (Former Member, Manunuri ng Pelikulang Pilipino)
  • Eduardo Roy, Jr. (Director; Bahay Bata; Quick Change)
  • Vincent Sandoval (Director; Aparisyon, Señorita)
  • Chris Eriz Sta. Maria (Film Blogger, The One-Legged Woman is Queen)
  • Rianne Hill Soriano (Film Reviewer, Business World)
  • Noel Vera (Film Writer, Critic after Dark): “Lino Brocka’s slum masterpiece–based on Mario O’Hara’s teleplay, with unforgettably squalid cinematography from the great Conrado Baltazar–is a tight-knitted three-way melodrama (mother, daughter, mother’s lover) whose intensity recalls Shakespeare’s Othello. Jealousy, hatred and revenge in a reckless carousel whirl, with an ambiguity rare in Brocka’s films–who is the victim, who the victimizer?”
  • Rodolfo Vera (Writer: Niño; Norte, Hangganan ng Kasaysayan)
  • Jessica Zafra (Film Reviewer, InterAksyon)
  • Jerome Zamora (Writer; Bahay Bata, Haruo)

6 – BIYAYA NG LUPA (Manuel Silos, 1959)

Biyaya ng LupaIt’s a testament to the enduring appeal of this 1959 family melodrama that it’s still being appreciated by younger viewers. Rosa Rosal is unforgettable as the matriarch who acts as the bedrock amidst the never-ending tragedies that befall her family.

Voted by:

  • Adolfo Alix, Jr. (Director; Haruo, Kalayaan)
  • Joey Baquiran (Member, Young Critics Circle Film Desk)
  • John Bedia (Writer; Amok, Boundary): “The Best FILIPINO FAMILY DRAMA ever. Universal and timeless.”
  • Patrick Campos (Professor, UP Film Institute)
  • Jan Philippe Carpio (Director; Balay Daku, Girl of My Dreams): “A film that showed me how the limiting form of film genre can be used to open us up into forms of living that challenge our commonly held biases and judgments by teaching us selflessness, compassion and forgiveness.”
  • Archie del Mundo (Director; Taksikab, Ang Misis ni Meyor)
  • Christopher Gozum (Director; Anacbanua, Lawas Kan Pinabli)
  • Jerry Gracio (Writer; Mater Dolorosa, Aparisyon)
  • Joni Gutierrez (Professor, UP Film Institute)
  • Mario Hernando (Member, Manunuri ng Pelikulang Pilipino)
  • Jason Jacobo (Member, Young Critics Circle Film Desk)
  • Nonoy Lauzon (Programmer, UP Film Institute)
  • Ed Lejano (Director, UP Film Institute)
  • Gerard Lico (Member, Young Critics Circle Film Desk)
  • Bienvenido Lumbera (National Artist for Literature)
  • Gutierrez Mangansakan II (Director; Limbunan, Qiyamah)
  • Dennis Marasigan (Director; Sa North Diversion Road, Vox Populi)
  • Ramon Nocon (Board Member, Society of Filipino Archivists for Film)
  • Bono Olgado (Director, National Fim Archives of the Philippines)
  • Ricky Orellana (Board Member, Society of Filipino Archivists for Film, Inc.): “I heard Ed Cabagnot praising this film as ‘the quintessential Filipino movie’. I totally agree with him.”
  • Simon Santos (Owner, Video 48)
  • Carlitos Siguion-Reyna (Director; Ikaw Pa Lang ang Minahal, Ligaya ang Itawag Mo sa Akin)
  • Jake Tordesillas (Writer; High School Circa ’65, Bagets): “Manuel Silos’ powerful portrait of rural life.”
  • Nestor U. Torre (Film Writer, Philippine Daily Inquirer)
  • Mauro Feria Tumbocon (Founder, Filipino Arts and Cinema)
  • Noel Vera (Film Writer, Critic after Dark): “Rosa Rosal and Tony Santos again struggling for survival, this time in the gorgeous Philippine countryside and under the direction of Manuel Silos; the film’s storytelling has the understated intensity of Renoir, the epic lyricism of Dozhenko–with Silos’ baskets, brimming to overflowing with fat lanzones, standing in for Dozhenko’s gigantic pears. “
  • Award-winning scriptwriter/producer who wishes to remain anonymous

5 – ORO PLATA MATA (Peque Gallaga, 1982)

Oro Plata MataGallaga’s grandiose epic on the Second World War’s impact on the country’s landed elite is a powerful commentary on ordinary humans’ capacity for evil.

Voted by:

  • Joey Agbayani (Director; Lola, Kidlat)
  • Misha Anissimov (Film Professor, University of San Carlos)
  • Dwein Tarhata Baltazar (Director, Mamay Umeng)
  • John Bedia (Writer; Amok, Boundary): “Epic.”
  • Patrick Campos (Professor, UP Film Institute)
  • Sari Dalena (Director; Ka Oryang, The Guerrilla Is a Poet)
  • Ray Defante Gibraltar (Director; Wanted: Border, When Timawa Meets Delgado)
  • Katski Flores (Director; Still Life, Dreamboy)
  • Jag Garcia (Film Professor, De la Salle-College of Saint Benilde)
  • Joni Gutierrez (Professor, UP Film Institute)
  • Antoinette Jadaone (Director; Six Degree of Separation from Lilia Cuntapay, Tumbang Preso)
  • Gerard Lico (Member, Young Critics Circle Film Desk)
  • Bienvenido Lumbera (National Artist for Literature)
  • Dado Lumibao (Director; In da Red Corner, Must Be Love)
  • Gutierrez Mangansakan II (Director; Limbunan, Qiyamah)
  • Dennis Marasigan (Director; Sa North Diversion Road, Vox Populi)
  • Cenon Palomares (Lecturer, UP Film Institute)
  • Jose Javier Reyes (Director; Makati Ave: Office Girls, Kasal Kasali Kasalo)
  • Shaira Mella Salvador-MacKenzie (Writer; Tanging Yaman, Sana Maulit Muli)
  • Vincent Sandoval (Director; Aparisyon, Señorita)
  • Dondon Santos (Director; Noy, Dalaw)
  • Joaquin Enrico Santos (Writer; In the Name of Love, The Strangers)
  • Simon Santos (Owner, Video 48)
  • Carlitos Siguion-Reyna (Director; Ikaw Pa Lang ang Minahal, Ligaya ang Itawag Mo sa Akin)
  • Nicanor Tiongson (Professor Emeritus, UP Film Institute)
  • Rolando Tolentino (Member, Manunuri ng Pelikulang Pilipino)
  • Jake Tordesillas (Writer; High School Circa ’65, Bagets): “shows Gallaga can combine his mastery of direction and production design.”
  • Rodolfo Vera (Writer: Niño; Norte, Hangganan ng Kasaysayan)
  • Jessica Zafra (Film Reviewer, InterAksyon)

4 – MANILA BY NIGHT (Ishmael Bernal, 1980)

Manila by NightFamously banned by the Marcos government for portraying Manila in a “bad” light, Manila by Night is a profoundly impressive canvas featuring some of the city’s most colorful denizens.

Voted by:

  • Adolfo Alix, Jr. (Director; Haruo, Kalayaan)
  • Joey Baquiran (Member, Young Critics Circle Film Desk)
  • John Bedia (Writer; Amok, Boundary): “Bernal effortlessly juggles between different characters, story and place with ease and the skill of a magician and master.”
  • Theodore Boborol (Writer; My Big Love, Kelly! Kelly! Ang Hit na Musical)
  • Libay Cantor (Professor, UP Film Institute): “Gotta love Ishma. The first truly all spectrum queer-inclusive Pinoy film for me. You got the L, G, B and even the T and Q in there. Plus the fact that it was subversive for its time yet it remained artistically intact is something to take note of.”
  • Jade Castro (Director; Endo, Zombadings)
  • Ina Avellana Cosio (Senior Lecturer, UP Film Institute)
  • Ray Defante Gibraltar (Director; Wanted: Border, When Timawa Meets Delgado)
  • Archie del Mundo (Director; Taksikab, Ang Misis ni Meyor)
  • Christopher Gozum (Director; Anacbanua, Lawas Kan Pinabli)
  • Eulalio Guieb III (Professor, UP College of Mass Communications)
  • Mario Hernando (Member, Manunuri ng Pelikulang Pilipino)
  • Antoinette Jadaone (Director; Six Degree of Separation from Lilia Cuntapay, Tumbang Preso)
  • Ralston Jover (Director; Bakal Boys, Bendor)
  • Nonoy Lauzon (Programmer, UP Film Institute)
  • Eileen Legaspi-Ramirez (Art Studies Professor, UP Diliman)
  • Ed Lejano (Director, UP Film Institute)
  • Gerard Lico (Member, Young Critics Circle Film Desk)
  • Ian Loreños (Director; Alagwa, The Leaving)
  • Bienvenido Lumbera (National Artist for Literature)
  • Dado Lumibao (Director; In da Red Corner, Must Be Love)
  • Dennis Marasigan (Director; Sa North Diversion Road, Vox Populi)
  • Pam Miras (Director; Pascalina, Wag Kang Titingin)
  • Cenon Palomares (Lecturer, UP Film Institute)
  • Jun Cruz Reyes (Former Member, Manunuri ng Pelikulang Pilipino)
  • Vincent Sandoval (Director; Aparisyon, Señorita)
  • Dondon Santos (Director; Noy, Dalaw)
  • Rolando Tolentino (Member, Manunuri ng Pelikulang Pilipino)
  • Jake Tordesillas (Writer; High School Circa ’65, Bagets): “Bernal’s masterpiece. Showed Manila at its darkest.”
  • Rodolfo Vera (Writer: Niño; Norte, Hangganan ng Kasaysayan)
  • Jessica Zafra (Film Reviewer, InterAksyon)
  • Award-winning scriptwriter/producer who wishes to remain anonymous

3 – KISAPMATA (Mike de Leon, 1981)

KisapmataArguably de Leon’s best work is a deeply troubling depiction of a dysfunctional family, featuring an imposing performance by Vic Silayan as evil personified.

Voted by:

  • Joey Agbayani (Director; Lola, Kidlat)
  • Adolfo Alix, Jr. (Director; Mater Dolorosa, Kalayaan)
  • Misha Anissimov (Film Professor, University of San Carlos)
  • Dwein Tarhata Baltazar (Director, Mamay Umeng)
  • Joey Baquiran (Member, Young Critics Circle Film Desk)
  • John Bedia (Writer; Amok, Boundary): “Masterful craftsmanship. Across the board triumph.”
  • Ray Defante Gibraltar (Director; Wanted: Border, When Timawa Meets Delgado)
  • Katski Flores (Director; Still Life, Dreamboy)
  • Jerry Gracio (Writer; Mater Dolorosa, Aparisyon)
  • Chuck Gutierrez (Producer, MNL 143; Director, Ulian)
  • Joni Gutierrez (Professor, UP Film Institute)
  • Mario Hernando (Member, Manunuri ng Pelikulang Pilipino)
  • Jeffrey Jeturian (Director; Kubrador, Pila Balde)
  • Coreen Jimenez (Director, Kano: An American and His Harem): “This movie still gives me goosebumps.”
  • Ralston Jover (Director; Bakal Boys, Bendor)
  • Skilty Labastilla (Member, Young Critics Circle Film Desk)
  • Jon Lazam (Director; Nang gabing maging singlaki ng puso ang bato ni Darna, Hindi sa Atin ang Buwan)
  • Ed Lejano (Director, UP Film Institute)
  • Jet Leyco (Director; Ex Press, Bukas Na Lang Sapagkat Gabi Na)
  • Ian Loreños (Director; Alagwa, The Leaving)
  • Bienvenido Lumbera (National Artist for Literature)
  • Dado Lumibao (Director; In da Red Corner, Must Be Love)
  • Gutierrez Mangansakan II (Director; Limbunan, Qiyamah)
  • Ramon Nocon (Board Member, Society of Filipino Archivists for Film)
  • Ricky Orellana (Board Member, Society of Filipino Archivists for Film, Inc.): “Mike De Leon’s scenes of mixed suspense and violence can cause great unease. Vic Silayan’s powerful performance is noteworthy.”
  • Jun Cruz Reyes (Former Member, Manunuri ng Pelikulang Pilipino)
  • Shaira Mella Salvador-MacKenzie (Writer; Tanging Yaman, Sana Maulit Muli)
  • Mike Sandejas (Director; Tulad ng Dati, Dinig Sana Kita)
  • Vincent Sandoval (Director; Aparisyon, Señorita)
  • Dondon Santos (Director; Noy, Dalaw)
  • Simon Santos (Owner, Video 48)
  • Rianne Hill Soriano (Film Reviewer, Business World)
  • Mauro Feria Tumbocon (Founder, Filipino Arts and Cinema)
  • Noel Vera (Film Writer, Critic after Dark): “Mike de Leon’s film adaptation of the Nick Joaquin true-life crime story “The House on Zapote Street” takes its cue from Stanley Kubrick’s The Shining, and in my opinion outstrips its inspiration in terms of claustrophobic horror. Easily his most intense, most real, most personal work, and arguably the most perfect Filipino film ever made.”
  • Jerome Zamora (Writer; Bahay Bata, Haruo)

2 – HIMALA (Ishmael Bernal, 1982) 

HimalaYearly Holy Week TV reruns have made Bernal’s magnum opus thankfully accessible to most Filipinos. Himala’s depiction of a poor people yearning for a miracle is an immense filmmaking triumph.

Voted by:

  • Joey Agbayani (Director; Lola, Kidlat)
  • Misha Anissimov (Film Professor, University of San Carlos)
  • Dwein Tarhata Baltazar (Director, Mamay Umeng)
  • Joey Baquiran (Member, Young Critics Circle Film Desk)
  • Theodore Boborol (Writer; My Big Love, Kelly! Kelly! Ang Hit na Musical)
  • Lex Bonife (Writer; Ang Lalake sa Parola, Ang Lihim ni Antonio): “A Filipino classic.”
  • Patrick Campos (Professor, UP Film Institute)
  • Ina Avellana Cosio (Senior Lecturer, UP Film Institute)
  • Sari Dalena (Director; Ka Oryang, The Guerrilla Is a Poet)
  • Ray Defante Gibraltar (Director; Wanted: Border, When Timawa Meets Delgado)
  • Archie del Mundo (Director; Taksikab, Ang Misis ni Meyor)
  • Wenn Deramas (Director; Ang Tanging Ina, Praybeyt Benjamin): “Malaking Pelikula na nagpapakita ng paniniwala/pananampalataya nating mga Pilipino, hinaluan pa ng init at gutom, ito ang pwedeng mangyari.”
  • Gary Devilles (Professor, Kagawaran ng Filipino, Ateneo de Manila University)
  • Zig Dulay (Writer; Posas, Ad Ignorantiam)
  • Katski Flores (Director; Still Life, Dreamboy)
  • Benjamin Garcia (Director; Batad: Sa Paang Palay, Philippino Story)
  • Jag Garcia (Film Professor, De la Salle-College of Saint Benilde)
  • Jerry Gracio (Writer; Mater Dolorosa, Aparisyon)
  • Eulalio Guieb III (Professor, UP College of Mass Communications)
  • Chuck Gutierrez (Producer, MNL 143; Director, Ulian)
  • Joni Gutierrez (Professor, UP Film Institute)
  • Antoinette Jadaone (Director; Six Degree of Separation from Lilia Cuntapay, Tumbang Preso)
  • Ralston Jover (Director; Bakal Boys, Bendor)
  • Skilty Labastilla (Member, Young Critics Circle Film Desk)
  • Eileen Legaspi-Ramirez (Art Studies Professor, UP Diliman)
  • Jet Leyco (Director; Ex Press, Bukas Na Lang Sapagkat Gabi Na)
  • Gerard Lico (Member, Young Critics Circle Film Desk)
  • Ian Loreños (Director; Alagwa, The Leaving)
  • Bienvenido Lumbera (National Artist for Literature)
  • Dado Lumibao (Director; In da Red Corner, Must Be Love)
  • Dennis Marasigan (Director; Sa North Diversion Road, Vox Populi)
  • Bono Olgado (Director, National Fim Archives of the Philippines)
  • Cenon Palomares (Lecturer, UP Film Institute)
  • Jose Javier Reyes (Director; Makati Ave: Office Girls, Kasal Kasali Kasalo)
  • Jun Cruz Reyes (Former Member, Manunuri ng Pelikulang Pilipino)
  • Eduardo Roy, Jr. (Director; Bahay Bata; Quick Change)
  • Chris Eriz Sta. Maria (Film Blogger, The One-Legged Woman is Queen)
  • Keith Sicat (Director; Ka Oryang, Woman of the Ruins)
  • Rianne Hill Soriano (Film Reviewer, Business World)
  • Nicanor Tiongson (Professor Emeritus, UP Film Institute)
  • Jake Tordesillas (Writer; High School Circa ’65, Bagets): “Unforgettable. Need I say more?”
  • Mauro Feria Tumbocon (Founder, Filipino Arts and Cinema)
  • Noel Vera (Film Writer, Critic after Dark): “Ishmael Bernal’s most visually striking, most hallucinatory film, the wasted landscape (actually the sandy dunes of Laoag) foreshadowing the devastation wreaked by the 1991 Pinatubo eruption. In this eerily prescient setting Bernal explores the hypocrisies and worse absurdities of religious institutions and religious faith, particularly the cult that has sprouted around the iconic figure of Nora Aunor’s miraculous faith healer.”
  • G.A. Villafuerte (Director, Lihim ng mga Nympha, Hardinero)
  • Jerome Zamora (Writer; Bahay Bata, Haruo)
  • Award-winning young director who wishes to remain anonymous

1 – MAYNILA SA MGA KUKO NG LIWANAG (Lino Brocka, 1975) 

MaynilaThe movie that shatters any poor soul’s dream of making it big in the country’s capital city, Maynila sa mga Kuko ng Liwanag succeeds in being both a love story (Julio Madiaga’s search for the love of his life is one of cinema’s most tragic romantic stories) and a formidable social commentary (on neoliberalism, on exploitation of cheap labor, among others). The film has been restored and will be shown in Cannes soon and in the Philippines in the coming months.

Voted by:

  • Joey Agbayani (Director; Lola, Kidlat)
  • Joey Baquiran (Member, Young Critics Circle Film Desk)
  • Theodore Boborol (Writer; My Big Love, Kelly! Kelly! Ang Hit na Musical)
  • Patrick Campos (Professor, UP Film Institute)
  • Libay Cantor (Professor, UP Film Institute): “Social realism at its finest, and I think Brocka’s best work talaga. Well acted, nice shots, almost documentary feel ang atmosphere yet the fictional story is poignantly put to life from the novel.”
  • Jade Castro (Director; Endo, Zombadings)
  • Ina Avellana Cosio (Senior Lecturer, UP Film Institute)
  • Sari Dalena (Director; Ka Oryang, The Guerrilla Is a Poet)
  • Ray Defante Gibraltar (Director; Wanted: Border, When Timawa Meets Delgado)
  • Archie del Mundo (Director; Taksikab, Ang Misis ni Meyor)
  • Benjamin Garcia (Director; Batad: Sa Paang Palay, Philippino Story)
  • Jag Garcia (Film Professor, De la Salle-College of Saint Benilde)
  • Christopher Gozum (Director; Anacbanua, Lawas Kan Pinabli)
  • Jerry Gracio (Writer; Mater Dolorosa, Aparisyon)
  • Eulalio Guieb III (Professor, UP College of Mass Communications)
  • Chuck Gutierrez (Producer, MNL 143; Director, Ulian)
  • Mario Hernando (Member, Manunuri ng Pelikulang Pilipino)
  • Jeffrey Jeturian (Director; Kubrador, Pila Balde)
  • Coreen Jimenez (Director, Kano: An American and His Harem): “This is like my Citizen Kane. It just had to be in my list.”
  • Ralston Jover (Director; Bakal Boys, Bendor)
  • Ed Lejano (Director, UP Film Institute)
  • Jet Leyco (Director; Ex Press, Bukas Na Lang Sapagkat Gabi Na)
  • Gerard Lico (Member, Young Critics Circle Film Desk)
  • Ian Loreños (Director; Alagwa, The Leaving)
  • Bienvenido Lumbera (National Artist for Literature)
  • Dado Lumibao (Director; In da Red Corner, Must Be Love)
  • Dennis Marasigan (Director; Sa North Diversion Road, Vox Populi)
  • Adrian Mendizabal (Film Writer, Auditoire)
  • Ramon Nocon (Board Member, Society of Filipino Archivists for Film)
  • Bono Olgado (Director, National Fim Archives of the Philippines)
  • Cenon Palomares (Lecturer, UP Film Institute)
  • Senedy Que (Writer; Mga Munting Tinig, Homecoming)
  • Jose Javier Reyes (Director; Makati Ave: Office Girls, Kasal Kasali Kasalo)
  • Eduardo Roy, Jr. (Director; Bahay Bata; Quick Change)
  • Mike Sandejas (Director; Tulad ng Dati, Dinig Sana Kita)
  • Joaquin Enrico Santos (Writer; In the Name of Love, The Strangers)
  • Simon Santos (Owner, Video 48)
  • Keith Sicat (Director; Ka Oryang, Woman of the Ruins)
  • Carlitos Siguion-Reyna (Director; Ikaw Pa Lang ang Minahal, Ligaya ang Itawag Mo sa Akin)
  • Nicanor Tiongson (Professor Emeritus, UP Film Institute)
  • Rolando Tolentino (Member, Manunuri ng Pelikulang Pilipino)
  • Jake Tordesillas (Writer; High School Circa ’65, Bagets): “Bembol’s eyes and Hilda’s helplessness will forever be in my memories.”
  • Nestor U. Torre (Film Writer, Philippine Daily Inquirer)
  • Mauro Feria Tumbocon (Founder, Filipino Arts and Cinema)
  • Rodolfo Vera (Writer: Niño; Norte, Hangganan ng Kasaysayan)
  • Jerome Zamora (Writer; Bahay Bata, Haruo)

100-51

50-41

40-31

30-21

20-11

INDIVIDUAL BALLOTS

6 thoughts on “50 Greatest Pinoy Films of All Time, Part 5 (10-1)

  1. May I add other remarkable films which are not included in this great list;

    10. Ikaw Pa Lang Ang Minahal
    9. Sister Stella L
    8. Ina ka ng Anak Mo
    7. Tagos ng Dugo
    6. Miguelito: Batang Rebelde
    5. Saan ka man Naroroon
    4. Tatlo, Dalawa, Isa
    3. Tinik sa Dibdib
    2. Bakit Bughaw ang Langit?
    1. Bulaklak sa City Jail

  2. May I add other remarkable films which are not included in this great list;

    10. Ikaw Pa Lang Ang Minahal
    9. Alyas Baby Tsina
    8. Ina ka ng Anak Mo
    7. Tagos ng Dugo
    6. Miguelito: Batang Rebelde
    5. Saan ka man Naroroon
    4. Tatlo, Dalawa, Isa
    3. Tinik sa Dibdib
    2. Bakit Bughaw ang Langit?
    1. Bulaklak sa City Jail

  3. Hi! Great blog!

    Would you know where I could find copies of some of the top films listed in this Greatest Pinoy films of all-time poll?

    I’d like to do a movie marathon of maybe 5 (or 10, if I can find them) of these films for my blog. So far, my top priorities are:

    1. LINO BROCKA – either “Maynila sa mga Kuko ng Liwanag”, “Tinimbang ka Ngunit Kulang” or “Insiang”
    2. ISHMAEL BERNAL – either “Himala”, “Manila By Night” or “”
    3. MIKE DE LEON – either “Kisapmata”, “Batch ’81” or “Itim”
    4. PEQUE GALLAGA – “Oro, Plata, Mata”
    5. EDDIE ROMERO – “Ganito Kami Noon… Paano Kayo Ngayon?”

    I hope you could point me towards directions where I could find the films. I’ve tried in Astrovision, Video City, Odyssey & Fully Booked pero wala kahit isa.

    I’m thinking maybe I could find some in CCP (I remember seeing a small store there that sold classic pinoy films when we watched Wicked recently) or maybe UP. The problem is that those places are not so accessible to me. Medyo malayo, especially CCP.

    So if you have any leads on where I could buy, please do tell me! Thanks!

    1. Hi, Oro Plata Mata and Himala have been recently remastered and they are now available on DVD. I saw copies in Astrovision. Maynila sa Kuko ng Liwanag has also been recently remastered so expect DVD copies to be sold soon.

      All the rest can be seen in Youtube.

      1. Thanks for the YouTube recommendation, although I’d much prefer actual copies.

        I called Astrovision and they said deleted na daw sa database nila yung films na hinahanap ko 😦 Not sure if that’s just for the branches that I called up or all, but that’s what they told me…

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