30 – TUHOG (Jeffrey Jeturian, 2000)

tuhogJeturian’s hilarious skewering of mainstream cinema’s sexploitation films is still as fresh today as it was thirteen years ago.

Voted by:

  • John Bedia (Writer; AmokBoundary): “Perfect blend of script and direction. The movie is witty and smart, funny and sad but at the same time true”
  • Theodore Boborol (Writer; My Big LoveKelly! Kelly! Ang Hit na Musical)
  • Zig Dulay (Writer; PosasEkstra)
  • Chuck Gutierrez (Producer, MNL 143; Director, Ulian)
  • Shaira Mella Salvador-MacKenzie (Writer; Tanging YamanSana Maulit Muli)
  • Jerome Zamora (Writer; Bahay BataHaruo)
  • Award-winning young director who wishes to remain anonymous

29 – KINATAY (Brillante Mendoza, 2009)

KinatayThe movie that Roger Ebert calls the worst in the history of Cannes takes viewers along a harrowing road trip to hell and back.

Voted by:

  • Theodore Boborol (Writer; My Big Love, Kelly! Kelly! Ang Hit na Musical)
  • Ina Avellana Cosio (Senior Lecturer, UP Film Institute)
  • Chuck Gutierrez (Producer, MNL 143; Director, Ulian)
  • Jet Leyco (Director; Ex Press, Bukas Na Lang Sapagkat Gabi Na)
  • Senedy Que (Writer; Mga Munting Tinig, Homecoming)
  • Rolando Tolentino (Member, Manunuri ng Pelikulang Pilipino)
  • Mauro Feria Tumbocon (Founder, Filipino Arts and Cinema)

 

28 – ANG PAGDADALAGA NI MAXIMO OLIVEROS (Auraeus Solito, 2005)

ang-pagdadalaga-ni-maximo-oliverosThe critical and commercial success of Maximo Oliveros encouraged young independent filmmakers to make more films and ushered in what is now regarded as the Third Golden Age of Philippine Cinema.

Voted by:

  • Theodore Boborol (Writer; My Big LoveKelly! Kelly! Ang Hit na Musical)
  • Libay Cantor (Professor, UP Film Institute): “Concept pa lang — pagdadalaga ng boylet — patok na. What more the rest of the narrative and the unforgettable character and actor that portrayed him. Never mind if it was shot so Star Cinematically polished for an “indie film” but hey, it works.”
  • Gary Devilles (Professor, Kagawaran ng Filipino, Ateneo de Manila University)
  • Katski Flores (Director; Still LifeDreamboy)
  • Jag Garcia (Film Professor, De la Salle-College of Saint Benilde)
  • Joni Gutierrez (Professor, UP Film Institute)
  • Ian Loreños (Director; AlagwaThe Leaving)
  • Eduardo Roy, Jr. (Director; Bahay BataQuick Change)

27 – MAGNIFICO (Maryo J. delos Reyes, 2003)

magnificoThe movie that is known to make grown men cry, Magnifico introduced moviegoers to the precociously talented Jiro Manio and established the career of gifted screenwriter Michiko Yamamoto.

Voted by:

  • John Bedia (Writer; AmokBoundary): “Beautiful script. Michiko’s best. The ensemble’s solid acting and Maryo J. delos Reyes’ fluid direction tempers the material’s inherent melodramatic potential.”
  • Zig Dulay (Writer; Posas, Ad Ignorantiam)
  • Coreen Jimenez (Director, Kano: An American and His Harem): “I always watch this movie whenever I see it on cable. There’s something special about this movie.”
  • Ralston Jover (Director; Bakal BoysBendor)
  • Ricky Orellana (Board Member, Society of Filipino Archivist for Film, Inc.): “Michiko Yamamoto’s script is the heart of this moving bittersweet drama. Good ensemble acting too.”
  • Eduardo Roy, Jr. (Director; Bahay BataQuick Change)
  • Arminda Santiago (Professor, UP Film Institute)
  • Jake Tordesillas (Writer; High School Circa ’65Bagets): “There is goodness in everyone.”

26 – SISTER STELLA L. (Mike de Leon, 1984)

sister stellaDe Leon shows how a deeply political film need not feel didactic or be artistically deficient.

Voted by:

  • Gary Devilles (Professor, Kagawaran ng Filipino, Ateneo de Manila University)
  • Eli Guieb (Professor, UP College of Mass Communications)
  • Senedy Que (Writer; Mga Munting Tinig, Homecoming)
  • Jun Cruz Reyes (Former Member, Manunuri ng Pelikulang Pilipino)
  • Vincent Sandoval (Director; Aparisyon, Señorita)
  • Rolando Tolentino (Member, Manunuri ng Pelikulang Pilipino)
  • Nestor U. Torre (Film Writer, Philippine Daily Inquirer)
  • Jerome Zamora (Writer; Bahay Bata, Haruo)

25 – BAYANING THIRD WORLD (Mike de Leon, 1999)

bayaning 3rd worldPerhaps the Jose Rizal movie that Rizal himself would most appreciate, Bayaning Third World entertainingly deconstructs the man behind the myth.

Voted by:

  • Patrick Campos (Professor, UP Film Institute)
  • Ina Avellana Cosio (Senior Lecturer, UP Film Institute)
  • Eli Guieb (Professor, UP College of Mass Communications)
  • Chuck Gutierrez (Producer, MNL 143; Director, Ulian)
  • Antoinette Jadaone (Director; Six Degree of Separation from Lilia CuntapayTumbang Preso)
  • Eileen Legaspi-Ramirez (Art Studies Professor, UP Diliman)
  • Jun Cruz Reyes (Former Member, Manunuri ng Pelikulang Pilipino)
  • Mike Sandejas (Director; Tulad ng DatiDinig Sana Kita)
  • Nicanor Tiongson (Professor Emeritus, UP Film Institute)

24 – SCORPIO NIGHTS (Peque Gallaga, 1985)

scorpio nightsOne of the best erotic films, Filipino or otherwise, Gallaga’s tale of surrendering to the call of the flesh when nothing else in life is as appealing has been imitated countless times but has never been matched.

Voted by:

  • Lex Bonife (Writer; Ang Lalake sa ParolaAng Lihim ni Antonio): “Erotica at its best.”
  • Libay Cantor (Professor, UP Film Institute): “So whenever they say the Filipino is conservative and devoid of sensuality ek, please direct them to old(!) movies and redirect them to this one. Yes, as a culture, we have kink. And even if we don’t say it out loud, the movies are proof that some things do exist in our culture. Like this one.”
  • Jade Castro (Director; EndoZombadings)
  • Zig Dulay (Writer; PosasAd Ignorantiam)
  • Ed Lejano (Director, UP Film Institute)
  • Eduardo Roy, Jr. (Director; Bahay BataQuick Change)
  • Joaquin Enrico Santos (Writer; In the Name of LoveThe Strangers)
  • Rianne Hill Soriano (Film Reviewer, Business World)
  • Award-winning scriptwriter/producer who wishes to remain anonymous

23 – GENGHIS KHAN (Manuel Conde, 1950)

genghis khanRecently remastered and restored, Conde’s epic vision of the beginnings of Genghis Khan’s rise to power begs to be seen on the big screen for its grandeur to be fully appreciated.

Voted by:

  • Patrick Campos (Professor, UP Film Institute)
  • Patrick Flores (Founding Member, Young Critics Circle Film Desk)
  • Chuck Gutierrez (Producer, MNL 143; Director, Ulian)
  • Skilty Labastilla (Member, Young Critics Circle Film Desk)
  • Bono Olgado (Director, National Film Archives of the Philippines)
  • Jose Javier Reyes (Director; Makati Ave: Office GirlsKasal Kasali Kasalo)
  • Jun Cruz Reyes (Former Member, Manunuri ng Pelikulang Pilipino)
  • Rianne Hill Soriano (Film Reviewer, Business World)
  • Jake Tordesillas (Writer; High School Circa ’65Bagets): “The first Filipino film to make an impact abroad.”

22 – MORAL (Marilou Diaz-Abaya, 1982)

MoralDiaz-Abaya was a very influential figure in Philippine cinema, with her films offering a clearly feminist perspective that’s largely absent in the male-dominated film industry, and Moral, in showing the individual travails and triumphs of four female friends, is the quintessential Pinoy feminist film.

Voted by:

  • Jan Philippe Carpio (Director; Balay DakuGirl of My Dreams): “A film that shattered the myth of separating the personal and the political and the tyranny of our film audience and life expectations of people.”
  • Zig Dulay (Writer; PosasAd Ignorantiam)
  • Bienvenido Lumbera (National Artist for Literature)
  • Bono Olgado (Director, National Film Archives of the Philippines)
  • Ricky Orellana (Board Member, Society of Filipino Archivists for Film, Inc.): “One particular scene in this movie which I can’t forget because it is funny yet strangely affecting is when Kathy (Gina Alajar) tries her best to sing in a studio believing that she can deliver but then realizes that she can’t hit the right notes; breaking down to heartfelt sobs in the middle of a recording.”
  • Senedy Que (Writer; Mga Munting TinigHomecoming)
  • Vincent Sandoval (Director; AparisyonSeñorita)
  • Arminda Santiago (Professor, UP Film Institute)
  • Rianne Hill Soriano (Film Reviewer, Business World)

21 – TATLONG TAONG WALANG DIYOS (Mario O’Hara, 1976)

tatlong taonTatlong Taon… is a war film: it is set in rural Philippines at the onset of the Second World War. But it is above all an anti-war film: it forces Filipino viewers to empathize with an “enemy”, to realize that, in the grand scheme of things, we are human beings first before we are anything else.

Voted by:

  • Archie del Mundo (Director; Taksikab, Ang Misis ni Meyor)
  • Patrick Flores (Founding Member, Young Critics Circle Film Desk)
  • Jerry Gracio (Writer; Mater Dolorosa, Aparisyon)
  • Joni Gutierrez (Professor, UP Film Institute)
  • Jason Jacobo (Member, Young Critics Circle Film Desk)
  • Nonoy Lauzon (Programmer, UP Film Institute)
  • Arminda Santiago (Professor, UP Film Institute)
  • Noel Vera (Film Writer, Critic after Dark): “Mario O’Hara’s masterwork, a film with enough empathy to understand even the wartime Japanese at their worse, the wartime Filipinos at their best. Visually and emotionally, the greatest Filipino film ever made.”
  • Rodolfo Vera (Writer: Niño; Norte, Hangganan ng Kasaysaysan)

100-51

50-41

40-31

20-11

10-1

Individual Ballots