The 50 Most Well-Loved Pinoy Films of the 2010’s (40-31)

40. Thy Womb

Brillante Mendoza, 2012

A Bajau midwife (Nora Aunor) copes with the irony of her own infertility amid the deprivations of her gypsy community in Tawi-Tawi. A saga of island life stuck between the devil of passion and the deep blue sea of tradition.

39. Nick and Chai

Cha Escala and Wena Sanchez, 2014

In November 2013, Super Typhoon Haiyan claimed the lives of Nick and Chai Quieta’s four children, leaving them with nothing but each other and a house torn to pieces. Now, four months later, we step inside the Quietas’ home and observe how they cope with their loss. What is reality like to lose all your kids of a sudden?

38. Zombadings: Patayin sa Shokot si Remington

Jade Castro, 2011

Remington (Martin Escudero) lives in a small provincial town. He’s a typical macho. During the day he works his ass off and at night he gets drunk to blow off steam. As a child Remington mercilessly harassed his homosexual neighbor until the man put a curse on him. One day Remington would turn gay. And it seems like the curse is slowly but surely working its magic. Remington is being forced out of a closet he never thought he’d be in. First his body language turns pink, then the way he talks and finally his sexual preference. Poor Remington finds himself entangled in a confusing threesome with his best friend and girlfriend. In the meantime his mother, a police officer, tries to find the perpetrator of a series of murders in the city’s gay and transsexual community. And the victims do not intend to remain under ground. They’re coming out of their coffins, Gloria Gaynor style!

37. Iskalawags

Keith Deligero, 2013

One day, in the small peaceful town of Barrio Malinawon, seven young punks, who call themselves the Iskalawags because of their shared love for Filipino action movies (particularly those starred by their idol Jeric Raval), decide to set out on a mini quest to find the tree that according to Palot-the gang’s de facto leader-bears the lone papaya fruit as large as the belly of Intoy’s father.

36. Violator

Eduardo Dayao, 2014

Manila is besieged by the worst typhoon to hit the country. Talk of the world coming to an end hangs in the air. And five men find themselves stranded inside a police station with a prisoner who may o may not be the devil. It’s going to be a long night.

35. Ekstra

Jeffrey Jeturian, 2013

A socio-realist drama-comedy film, it follows a seemingly usual day in the life of Loida Malabanan (Vilma Santos) as she embarks on yet another shooting day of a soap opera as an extra. As the shoot goes on, we get a glimpse of the truth in the ruling system of the production as well as the exploitation of the marginalized laborers like her.

34. Signal Rock

Chito S. Roño, 2018

Intoy (Christian Bables) was left to take care of his parents when his sister Vicky (Judy Ann Santos) leaves to work overseas. Eventually, like many women in the island, Vicky married a foreigner thinking it will solve all her family’s problems. Living in a remote area, Intoy can only get in touch with his sister by scrambling atop strange rock formations on the island.

33. Die Beautiful

Jun Lana, 2016

Trisha (Paolo Ballesteros), a Filipino transgender woman, suddenly dies while being crowned in a beauty pageant. Her last wish was to be presented as a different celebrity on each night of her wake.

32. Ang Babae sa Septic Tank

Marlon Rivera, 2011

Three film school graduates are dead set on making an Oscar-worthy film. They set out to do a quick courtesy call to their lead actor, played by Eugene Domingo (playing herself), and a thorough inspection of their film’s major location, the Payatas dumpsite. They believe they have a winning script, and the energy and drive to make their dreams come true, no matter the cost.

31. Dagitab

Giancarlo Abrahan, 2014

While the marriage of two professors (Eula Valdez and Nonie Buencamino) is on the verge of falling apart the woman is dragged into a scandal involving a young student. On the other hand, the man falls in love with the subject of his research—a deity that appears to him as the ghost of an old fame.

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