100 Best Filipino Films Directed by Women, 40-31

40     Sid & Aya: Not a Love Story (Irene Emma Villamor, 2018)

Sid

Sid (Dingdong Dantes) is a guy who suffers from insomnia. Through the many lonely nights, he meets Aya (Anne Curtis). Who is she, really? And how will she change Sid’s life?

39     Alkitrang Dugo (Lupita Aquino-Kashiwahara, 1975)

Alkitrang Dugo

Adapted from The Lord of the Flies, a group of Filipino teenage boys and girls survives a plane crash and copes to live in an island amid politics, social class, sanity and death.

38     Big Boy (Shireen Seno, 2011) 

Big Boy3

A coming-of-age tale about a boy and his family in 1950s Mindoro, Philippines, and how he is groomed into becoming the poster boy for his parents’ home-based business. The film is an experimental portrait of a family amidst change — an experience that will engage audiences in something strange but familiar.

37     Lorna (Sigrid Andrea Bernardo, 2014) 

Lorna2

Lorna (Shamaine Buencamino) is a sixty year-old woman who is constantly searching for the right man, having failed at so many relationships. Having lived close to a lifetime alone, she decides to take another stab at moving on and, more importantly, love.

36     Last Supper No. 3 (Veronica Velasco, 2009) 

Last Supper3

Assistant Production Designer Wilson Nañawa (Joey Paras) is tasked to look for a Last Supper to use as a prop for a TV commercial. He finds three, but loses the one owned by Gareth Pugeda. What happens next changes Wilson forever as he spends the next two years entangled in bureaucracy and red tape facing estafa and serious physical injury charges. How will this ordinary man fare against a system he knows nothing about? Will justice prevail for Wilson? Or will he be imprisoned for the loss of Last Supper No. 3?

35     Sa Palad ng Dantaong Kulang (Jewel Maranan, 2018) 

Dantaon

Four families live in the seams of Manila’s busiest international port. In the hours of their ordinary days, they hear and see the wealth of different nations, packed as cargo, passing them by, leaving and entering Manila’s shores. But soon, the port expands and panic starts. Sa Palad ng Dantaong Kulang is a filmic symphony depicting the increasing everyday violence in the aspiration for a city fit for globalization.

34     Kita Kita (Sigrid Andrea Bernardo, 2017) 

kita-kita

Lea (Alessandra de Rossi) is a tour guide in Japan who suffers from temporary blindness. Tonyo (Empoy Marquez) who lives right across from Lea is persistent and determined to be her friend. As they become closer, Lea sees the true character of Tonyo.

33     Booba (Joyce Bernal, 2001) 

Booba2

Booba (Rufa Mae Quinto), newly arrived in the bustling metropolis (her choice of transportation from her far-flung province, where her family owns a profitable fruit stand, should be seen to be believed), moves from an all-male dormitory (with its hole-infested bathroom door, for better peeping of course) where she worked the nights as a go-go dancer, to a Filipino-Chinese household where she worked as a nanny to an overfed eight-year-old, before ending up as the police’s top secret agent.

32     Riles (Ditsi Carolino, 2003) 

Riles

Riles is a documentary about the life of a riles resident, Eddie, in a squatter area along the railroad tracks within the downtrodden section of Balic-balic, Manila.

31     Boses (Ellen Ongkeko-Marfil, 2008) 

Boses

Musician Ariel (Coke Bolipata) discovers the immense talent of 7-year-old Onyok (Julian Duque) hiding behind a veneer of silence and pain caused by an unhappy and cruel father. In the developing relationship of teacher and student, both characters reveal more of themselves that otherwise may have remained unspoken. They discover each other’s strengths and failures through the violin lessons.

1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10

Advertisements

One thought on “100 Best Filipino Films Directed by Women, 40-31

  1. I think the films of Maria Saret in the 70’s like “Rugged Terry” starring Beth Bautista is also good.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s