Mula sa Kung AnoVerdict: Essential Viewing

Pinoy Rebyu Score: 4.17 (6 ratings)

Genre: Drama

Writer/Director: Lav Diaz

Cast: Perry Dizon, Roeder, Hazel Orencio, Karenina Haniel, Reynan Abcede, Mailes Kanapi, Ian Lomongo, Joel Saracho, Evelyn Vargas

Synopsis: The Philippines, 1972. Mysterious things are happening in a remote barrio. Wails are heard from the forest, cows are hacked to death, a man is found bleeding to death at the crossroad and houses are burned. Ferdinand E. Marcos announces Proclamation No. 1081 putting the entire country under Martial Law.

Running time: 338 mins.

*

Trailer: 

Reviews:

5.0         Oggs Cruz (Rappler)

“Diaz, by weaving together those tales into a single epic, has summarized a country’s painful history not with facts and dates but with impressions and emotions. Mula Sa Kung Saan Ang Noon is sustained by evocative tableaus of human beings in various degrees of personal, spiritual and political strife.” (Read full review)

4.5         Roghadal Saint-Michel (Brun Philippines)

“Five hours into the movie and you are sucked into the dilemma of the small barrio. You are transfixed to the grandeur and mystery of the locale.” (Read full review)

4.0         Rito Asilo (Philippine Daily Inquirer)

“The movie’s unorthodox rhythms and lengthy screening time allow the characters to get under viewers’ skin—and, by the time you leave the theater, you develop a lived-in familiarity and affinity to them.” (Read full review)

4.0         Renelson Morelos (Ramblings of a Film Urchin)

Noon.. is surprisingly accessible. That is, less are the hazy abstractions, but more is a perceptive humanism, a quality which made Batang West Side and Norte the great films that they are.” (Read full review)

4.0         Jonell Estillore (Film Police)

“The allegory in Mula sa Kung Ano ang Noon does not only symbolize relevant social concepts and psychological ideas but also encapsulate the present from what is before. One should take a dose of this to be able to comprehend native terrors and innate dejection.” (Read full review)

3.5         Fred Hawson (Fred Said)

“Lav Diaz intelligently captures the drama of the location in impeccable black and white, which made details stand out. Shooting this place in color would have come off as drab.” (Read full review)